Biomanufacturing is revolutionizing how everything from consumer goods to sustainable fuels and medicines are made. The Lab’s Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Process Development Unit is helping to move great ideas, like outdoor gear made from algae oil, from conception to commercialization.
The largest set of data yet from an underground experiment called CUORE sets more stringent limits on a theoretical ultra-rare particle process known as neutrinoless double-beta decay that could help to explain the abundance of matter over antimatter in the universe.
An upgrade of the Advanced Light Source has passed an important milestone that will help to maintain the ALS’ world-leading capabilities. On Dec. 23 the DOE granted approval for a key funding step that will allow the project to start construction on a new inner electron storage ring known as an accumulator ring.
Evaporation ponds can occupy a large footprint and pose risks to wildlife, yet are an economical way to deal with contaminated water. Berkeley Lab researchers have demonstrated a way to use solar energy and water’s inherent properties to potentially reduce the environmental impact of these ponds.
The launch of a nationwide alliance of national labs, universities, and industry will advance the frontiers of quantum computing systems designed to solve urgent scientific challenges and maintain U.S. leadership in next-generation information technology. Berkeley Lab is among the members of the alliance.
Our 10 most popular news stories in 2019 reflect the scope of our scientific achievements this year, ranging from a new way to recycle plastic to spearheading a once-in-a-generation investment in water treatment technologies. Here are the most viewed stories at the Berkeley Lab News Center this year, followed by four Editor’s Picks.
A team led by scientists that included Berkeley Lab researchers has simulated the formation of a disc of matter, a giant burst of ejected matter, and the startup of energetic jets in the aftermath of a merger by two neutron stars.
A team of scientists led by Berkeley Lab has transformed diamonds’ natural atomic flaws into an ultrasensitive diamond anvil sensor that could open the door to a new generation of smart, designer materials, as well as the synthesis of new chemical compounds, atomically fine-tuned by pressure.
Scientists at Berkeley Lab are the first to use cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to image atomic changes in artificial proteins known as “peptoids.” Their findings have implications for the synthesis of soft, 2D materials for a wide variety of applications.
Berkeley Lab’s Chris Mungall and Nomi Harris explain how agreeing on precise definitions of each rare disease can lead to more accurate diagnoses and better treatments, and share new evidence showing this endeavor is more important than ever.