Most of the remaining components needed to fully assemble an underground dark matter-search experiment called LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) arrived at the project’s South Dakota home in June. When complete, LZ will be the largest, most sensitive U.S.-based experiment yet that is designed to directly detect dark matter particles.
An optical sensor developed at Berkeley Lab could speed up the time it takes to evaluate whether buildings are safe to occupy after a major earthquake. The Discrete Diode Position Sensor (DDPS) will be deployed for the first time this summer in a multi-story building at Berkeley Lab – which sits adjacent to one of the most dangerous faults in the United States.
Nearly ten years ago, a Berkeley Lab research team was asked to help solve the mystery of a rare inherited disease that caused extreme, and sometimes fatal, chronic diarrhea in children. Now, following an arduous investigative odyssey, they announced the discovery of the genetic explanation for this disease.
A study by scientists at Berkeley Lab modeled several different types and ages of homes, retail stores, and office buildings in cities across California and the U.S. and found that sunlight-reflecting “cool” exterior walls can save as much or more energy than sunlight-reflecting cool roofs in many places.
Two scientists with Berkeley Lab are among 315 researchers named on July 2 by President Donald Trump to receive the prestigious Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Two faculty scientists jointly affiliated with Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Berkeley are also among those selected to receive the honor.
Sure, computers can be used to play grandmaster-level chess, but can they make scientific discoveries? Berkeley Lab researchers have shown that an algorithm with no training in materials science can scan the text of millions of papers and uncover new scientific knowledge.
Berkeley Lab recently received federal approval to proceed with preliminary design work for a state-of-the-art building that would revolutionize investigations into how interactions among microbes, water, soil, and plants shape entire ecosystems. Research performed in the building could help address many of today’s energy, water, and food challenges.
Leonardo da Vinci wrote that humans “know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot.” His sentiment still holds true. But that could soon change. A new study details how an improved method for studying microbes in the soil will help scientists understand both fine-grained details and large-scale cycles of the environment.
A new biosynthetic production pathway developed at the Joint BioEnergy Institute could provide a sustainable alternative to conventional synthetic blue dye. The highly efficient fungi-based platform may also open the door for producing many other valuable biological compounds that are currently very hard to manufacture.
The Lab’s new Integrative Genomics Building (IGB) was dedicated on June 19. By uniting leading experts and world-class technologies under one roof, the IGB will help transform plant and microbial genomics research into solutions for today’s most pressing environmental and energy issues.