Groundwater contamination is a widespread environmental problem, requiring long-term monitoring to solve. What is the most cost-effective way to monitor when the contaminant plumes are large, complex, and long-term, or an unexpected events cause sudden changes in contaminant levels that may be missed by periodic sampling?
Researchers from Berkeley Lab have developed a new benchmark model that estimates changes in the proportion of the Earth’s surface where plant growth will no longer be limited by cold temperatures in the 21st century.
By shining highly focused infrared light on living cells, scientists hope to unmask individual cell identities, diagnose whether the cells are diseased or healthy, and produce detailed, color-based maps of individual cells and collections of cells to be analyzed using machine-learning techniques to automatically sort out cell characteristics.
Indoor air researchers recently tested seven consumer-grade air quality monitors to see if they could detect fine particles emitted by common household activities, including cooking, burning candles, and smoking. All of the monitors were found to have either underreported or missed the presence of very small particles that can penetrate deeply into the lungs.
Hollow molecular structures known as COFs (covalent organic frameworks) suffer from an inherent problem: It’s difficult to keep a network of COFs connected in harsh chemical environments. Now, a Berkeley Lab team has used a chemical process discovered decades ago to make the linkages between COFs much more sturdy, and to give the COFs new characteristics that could expand their applications.
A large titanium cryostat designed to keep its contents chilled to minus 148 degrees has completed its journey from Europe to South Dakota, where it will become part of a next-generation dark matter detector for the LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment.
Researchers at the Molecular Foundry, have pioneered a technique that uses nanoscale imaging to understand how local, nanoscale properties can affect a material’s macroscopic performance. This allows them to map the current at every point of a photoelectrochemical material for use in an artificial photosynthesis system.
An international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth.
Two visiting poets – Kate Greene, a former Berkeley Lab science writer who is an author, essayist, journalist, and poet; and fellow poet, writer, and science enthusiast Anastasios Karnazes – drew inspiration from an overnight stay at Berkeley Lab’s 88-Inch Cyclotron.
The NOvA particle physics experiment drew heavily upon the computing power at Berkeley Lab’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) in a new analysis that took a deep dive into experimental data about neutrino interactions and found evidence of antineutrino oscillation.