An international team of scientists has found the first evidence of a source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, ghostly subatomic particles that can travel unhindered for billions of light years from the most extreme environments in the universe to Earth.
Two visiting poets – Kate Greene, a former Berkeley Lab science writer who is an author, essayist, journalist, and poet; and fellow poet, writer, and science enthusiast Anastasios Karnazes – drew inspiration from an overnight stay at Berkeley Lab’s 88-Inch Cyclotron.
The NOvA particle physics experiment drew heavily upon the computing power at Berkeley Lab’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) in a new analysis that took a deep dive into experimental data about neutrino interactions and found evidence of antineutrino oscillation.
A team led by Berkeley Lab has leveraged powerful supercomputing at NERSC to simulate ground motion at unprecedented resolution. Their work – part of DOE’s Exascale Computing Project – is important for showing how different seismic wave frequencies of ground motion affect structures of various sizes.
In what could address a critical bottleneck in biology research, Berkeley Lab researchers announced they have pioneered a new way to synthesize DNA sequences through a creative use of enzymes that promises to be faster, cheaper, and more accurate.
Researchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported.
IT recently hosted second graders from Berkeley’s Sylvia Mendez Elementary School (formerly LeConte) to teach them about computers, including hardware, software, programming, parallel computing, networking, and tech vocabulary. They even built their own computer. The program, now in its ninth year, is part of IT’s STEM outreach efforts.
Experiments conducted at Berkeley Lab helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles – collected from Earth’s upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets – contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.
About $20 billion worth of energy leaks out of windows in the United States each winter. Berkeley Lab researchers are now working with manufacturers to bring to market a “super window” that is at least twice as insulating as 99 percent of the windows for sale today and will be ready to achieve mass-market status.
Lab researchers have coupled graphene, a monolayer form of carbon, with thin layers of magnetic materials like cobalt and nickel to produce exotic behavior in electrons that could be useful for next-generation computing applications.