Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a new electrocatalyst that can directly convert carbon dioxide into multicarbon fuels and alcohols using record-low inputs of energy. The work is the latest in a round of studies tackling the challenge of creating a clean chemical manufacturing system that can put carbon dioxide to good use.
In a big step toward sun-powered fuel production, scientists at Berkeley Lab have used artificial photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide into hydrocarbons at efficiencies greater than plants. The achievement marks a significant advance in the effort to move toward sustainable sources of fuel. 
A new Lab-led study provides insight into how an ultrathin coating can enhance the performance of graphene-wrapped nanocrystals for hydrogen storage applications. The findings could help researchers understand how similar coatings could also enhance the performance and stability of other materials that show promise for hydrogen storage applications.
Using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), Berkeley Lab researchers have obtained 3-D models of a human transcription factor at near-atomic resolutions. The protein complex is critical to gene expression and DNA repair, and could aid research in targeted drug development.  
Berkeley Lab scientists have discovered the details of an unconventional coupling between a bacterial protein and a mineral that allows the bacterium to breathe when oxygen is not available. The research could lead to new innovations, such as sensors that can diagnose disease or detect contaminants.
Lab researchers have developed a new method of analyzing the molecular-scale structure of organo-lead halide perovskites, a promising class of materials that could energize the solar cell industry.
New theories and 3-D simulations help explain what’s at work in the mysterious jets of energy and matter beaming from the center of galaxies at nearly the speed of light. As much as half of the jets’ energy can escape in the form of X-rays and stronger forms of radiation. Two different mechanisms serve to reduce about half of the energy of these jets.
The researchers were selected by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science to receive significant funding for research through its Early Career Research Program. The program bolsters the nation’s scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early career years, when many scientists do their most formative work.
Lab scientists have developed new computer models to explore what happens when a black hole joins a neutron star, the superdense remnant of an exploded star. The simulations are intended to help detectors home in on the gravitational-wave signals.
A newly discovered collective rattling effect in a type of crystalline semiconductor blocks most heat transfer while preserving high electrical conductivity – a rare pairing that scientists say could reduce heat buildup in electronic devices and turbine engines, among other possible applications.