In what could address a critical bottleneck in biology research, Berkeley Lab researchers announced they have pioneered a new way to synthesize DNA sequences through a creative use of enzymes that promises to be faster, cheaper, and more accurate.
Researchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported.
IT recently hosted second graders from Berkeley’s Sylvia Mendez Elementary School (formerly LeConte) to teach them about computers, including hardware, software, programming, parallel computing, networking, and tech vocabulary. They even built their own computer. The program, now in its ninth year, is part of IT’s STEM outreach efforts.
Experiments conducted at Berkeley Lab helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles – collected from Earth’s upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets – contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.
About $20 billion worth of energy leaks out of windows in the United States each winter. Berkeley Lab researchers are now working with manufacturers to bring to market a “super window” that is at least twice as insulating as 99 percent of the windows for sale today and will be ready to achieve mass-market status.
Lab researchers have coupled graphene, a monolayer form of carbon, with thin layers of magnetic materials like cobalt and nickel to produce exotic behavior in electrons that could be useful for next-generation computing applications.
Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a way to use machine learning to dramatically accelerate the design of microbes that produce biofuel. The new approach promises to speed up the development of biomolecules for many applications in addition to commercially viable biofuels, such as drugs that fight antibiotic-resistant infections and crops that withstand drought.
An international team led by scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley discovered how to exploit defects in nanoscale and microscale diamonds, and potentially enhance the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance systems while eliminating the need for their costly and bulky superconducting magnets.
An international team, led by Berkeley Lab scientists, has demonstrated a breakthrough in the design and function of nanoparticles that could make solar panels more efficient by converting light usually missed by solar cells into usable energy.
In collaboration with the American Wind Energy Association and the U.S. Geological Survey, Lab researchers have released the most comprehensive publicly available database yet of U.S. wind turbine locations and characteristics. The database will allow unparalleled ability for government agencies and others to make planning decisions.