flagflag Chapter 19
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)

Contents

Approved by Mike Wisherop
Revised 02/13

19.1 Policy
19.2 Scope
19.3 Applicability
19.4 Exceptions
19.5 Roles and Responsibilities
19.6 Definitions
19.7 Required Work Processes

Work Process A. PPE Flowchart
Work Process B. General PPE Requirements
Work Process C. Procurement of PPE
Work Process D. Authorization and Qualification to Use PPE
Work Process E. Specific PPE Requirements

19.8 Source Requirements
19.9 Reference Documents
19.10 Appendices

Appendix A. PPE and Food/Drink Requirements and Responsibilities Tables
Appendix B. FAQs about Reducing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Requirements and Changing the No-Food/Drink Policy in Technical Areas

NOTE:
. . . . . Denotes a new section.
. . . . . . . . Denotes the beginning of changed text within a section.
. . . . . . . . Denotes the end of changed text within a section.

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19.1 Policy

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements are established for each technical area based on the specific hazards of the area. PPE requirements for each technical area are listed on the Berkeley Lab technical area entrance placard, which can be downloaded from the Laboratory’s Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan. These area PPE requirements are in effect for the entire technical area.
A risk-based approach is applied to use of PPE at Berkeley Lab:

19.2 Scope

This program’s scope includes Berkeley Lab technical areas, such as laboratories, shops, mechanical rooms, construction projects, and maintenance areas.

19.3 Applicability

This program applies to all Laboratory employees, subcontractors, vendors, visitors, and affiliates who work in or travel through technical areas.

19.4 Exceptions

Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the EHSS Division Director using the process described in the Guidelines for Exceptions to Policy on Personal Protective Equipment and Food in Technical Areas.

19.5 Roles and Responsibilities

Roles

Responsibilities

Area Safety Leaders

  • Determine (through consultation with supervisors ,work leads who authorized operations, and/or EHSS) the area PPE requirements for their assigned low and medium hazard technical areas (see Appendix A)
  • Ensure that entrances are posted with these minimum requirements

Line Management

  • Reviews operations within a technical area and determines process-dependent PPE requirements over and above the area PPE requirements for that area
  • Re-evaluates PPE requirements whenever the work or the physical layout changes
  • Coordinates with the area safety leader to ensure that the hazards associated with his or her operations are reflected in the entrance placard
  • Ensures PPE is available for workers as required

Workers

All workers in technical areas, including area safety leaders, supervisors, and work leads, are responsible for:

  • Knowing the PPE requirements for technical areas in which they work
  • Complying with the applicable PPE requirements
  • Informing others in the area of these requirements

EHSS Liaisons and SMEs

EHSS Liaisons are the first point of contact for the ASL to provide consultation for medium hazard technical area PPE selection.
EHSS SMEs may be asked by the Liaison to provide specific PPE consultation in their area of expertise.

EHSS Division Director

Must approve exceptions to this policy

19.6 Definitions

Term

Definition

PPE

Personal protective clothing and equipment worn by workers designed to protect the body from injury by hazardous agents, conditions, or materials.

head protection

Protective helmet worn when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects or electrical shock

face protection

Safety devices such as a face mask, face shield, or other splatter guard worn over all or part of the face to protect from injury or exposure to  flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, biological materials, chemical gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation

eye protection

Safety devices such as safety glasses or goggles worn over the eyes to prevent injury or exposure to flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, biological materials, chemical gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation

foot protection

Protective footwear worn when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries from falling or rolling objects, or objects piercing the sole, and where an employee’s feet are exposed to electrical hazards or chemical spills

hand protection

Gloves or other protective devices worn on the hand to prevent injury to the hand or direct skin contact with sharp edges, rough, hot, or cold surfaces, and exposures to electrical hazards, biological materials, or chemical hazards

skin protection

Protective clothing such as a lab coat, gown, smock, coveralls, or uniform designed to keep personal clothing, forearms or other exposed skin protected from contamination or injury by chemical, biological, or radiological materials or exposure to other hazards 

technical area

Technical areas generally include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas. Offices, conference rooms, food preparation, and consumption areas such as the cafeteria, kitchenettes, and break rooms are generally not technical areas.

19.7 Required Work Processes

Work Process A. PPE Flowchart
Work Process B. General PPE Requirements
Work Process C. Procurement of PPE
Work Process D. Authorization and Qualification to Use PPE
Work Process E. Specific PPE Requirements

Work Process A. PPE Flowchart

Work Process B. General PPE Requirements

  1. Minimum Area PPE Requirements. Minimum area PPE requirements for specific technical areas are as follows:
    1. Laboratories where chemicals or biological materials are stored or handled: Protective eyewear (e.g., safety glasses with side shields), long pants, and closed-toe shoes must be worn at all times. Additional PPE may be necessary when handling chemicals or biological materials (e.g., goggles, lab coat, and chemically resistant protective gloves for handling hazardous chemicals). Consult the following for more details:
      1. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan
      2. Job Hazards Analysis
      3. Any formal authorizations
    2. Machine, welding, and craft shops where a potential hazard exists: Protective eyewear (e.g., safety glasses with side shields), long pants, and closed-toe shoes must be worn at all times. Additional PPE may be necessary when handling chemicals or other hazardous materials (e.g., goggles, shop coat, and chemically resistant protective gloves for handling hazardous chemicals) or when performing other tasks. Consult the following for more details:
      1. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan
      2. PUB-3000, Chapter 25, Machine Safeguarding — Shop and Lab Machine Safety
      3. Job Hazards Analysis
      4. Any formal authorizations
    3. Other technical areas (e.g., microscope rooms, electronics shops, assembly shops):  The area safety lead, and when appropriate EHSS, may perform a hazard analysis of the work being performed in the area to determine the types of PPE required. PPE selected to control the hazards in the area must be documented on the area’s door signs or prominently posted to be visible from all approaches to the task requiring specific PPE. Before the hazard assessment and PPE controls are listed on the door sign, the minimum PPE requirement is safety glasses with side shields, long pants, and closed-toed shoes. For additional help, see Appendix A, PPE Responsibilities Table, and Appendix B, PPE Selection FAQs.
    4. Visitors and others walking through a technical area but not performing work in that area must wear the minimum area PPE, but generally are not required to wear additional PPE that is assigned to those who are performing operations in the technical area.
    5. Protective clothing is not a substitute for adequate engineering controls.
    6. Appendix B to 29 CFR 1910, Subpart I, provides non-mandatory compliance guidelines for making a hazard assessment to determine the type of PPE needed for activities and operations.
    7.  PPE requirements may be temporarily suspended for special tours of a particular technical area. Hazardous work may not take place nor may hazardous conditions exist while PPE requirements are suspended. A written description of the area(s) covered, the conditions necessary, and duration of the suspended PPE requirements must be authorized by the principal investigator (PI) or line manager and communicated to all impacted workers.
  2. Protective Clothing
    1. Criteria for Issue. To protect their health and safety, employees who work with hazardous materials are issued protective clothing. EHSS is available for consultation as needed. The Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan gives additional guidance for the selection and use of PPE.
    2. Foot Protection
      1. Berkeley Lab policy requires workers to wear protective footwear when working in areas where there is risk of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, objects piercing the sole, or work-related fatigue, or where workers’ feet are exposed to electrical hazards. When safety shoes are required, they must meet the specifications of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F2413-05. Some examples of work that requires safety shoes are working in shops, equipment handling, and construction jobs. Workers exposed to hot, cold (cryogenic), corrosive, or poisonous substances, or who work in abnormally wet locations must wear safety shoes of adequate construction and type for the specific work area. For laboratory activities, minimum PPE required by the Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan includes closed-toe footwear. Open-toe shoes and sandals are not permitted in laboratories. Footwear appropriate to work activities and conditions must be worn at all times.
      2. Berkeley Lab encourages the wearing of protective footwear by making it available on site for employees to purchase at cost from a manufacturer's shoe-mobile. When protective footwear is required by Berkeley Lab policy, the department requesting the footwear will contribute an amount toward the cost, as determined each year by the Office of the Director. However, if the employee selects protective footwear for which the total cost (including sales tax) exceeds this amount, the difference must be paid by the employee. The supervisor authorizing the purchase will complete a Safety Shoe Issuance Form. The manufacturer's shoe-mobile sells protective footwear without a supervisor's authorization when employees wish to purchase it through the low-cost program (cash, check, or credit card). Safety shoes and fatigue-reducing insoles are furnished by Berkeley Lab for certain off-site operations when a formal hazard evaluation has established the need for foot protection. Additional information about the Berkeley Lab protective footwear program can be obtained at the EHSS Division's Personal Protective Equipment Web site.
    3. Hand Protection
      1. The Laboratory provides proper hand protection to employees exposed to known hand hazards, such as from absorption of harmful substances, severe cuts, lacerations or abrasions, chemical burns, contact with biological materials, and extreme temperatures. Supervisors must obtain suitable hand protection and must ensure that it is used. The Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan provides guidance for the selection of chemically resistant gloves. Central Stores stocks a variety of hand protection. Gloves may also be purchased through the eProcurement system. Individual departments are responsible for maintaining a supply of adequate hand protection.
      2. An Industrial Hygienist can assist with selecting appropriate hand protection.
    4. Head Protection
      1. The Laboratory provides hard hats that meet ANSI Standard Z89.1 (2003) for Laboratory employees who work in conditions where there is a potential for head injury from falling or flying objects or when there is a danger from exposed electrical conductors (29 CFR 1910.135). Hard hats are available through the eProcurement system, or from Central Stores.
      2. The Laboratory employee responsible for oversight of day-to-day operations at a job site is also responsible for specifying when head protection is required. This person is usually the construction superintendent. Head protection is required in the following situations:
        1. Anytime there is a danger of falling or flying objects
        2. Overhead construction is in progress
        3. Any area near exposed electrical conductors where a danger of arcing may exist
        4. Any excavation or trench where loose rock or soil could pose a danger by falling from the excavation face
        5. Any area around a crane lift or similar situation where objects being swung, dropped, etc., may present a danger
        6. Whenever the construction superintendent or other responsible employee has reason to believe danger exists
      3. A sufficient number of hard hats will be maintained at the site for visitors.
    5. Eye Protection
      1. All persons must wear safety glasses, goggles, or a face shield whenever they run a reasonable probability of eye injury resulting from work being performed. Staff must use appropriate eye or face protection when exposed to hazards from flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustics, biological materials, chemical gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation. Eye protection with side shields must be used when there is a hazard from flying objects. Some work areas (e.g., chemical laboratories and workshops) are designated as “eye-hazard areas.” In these areas, the eye-protection requirement must be posted at each entrance (i.e., listed in the required PPE section of the area caution sign).
      2. Berkeley Lab provides appropriate eye-protection devices for employees assigned to tasks that expose them to an eye-injury hazard.
      3. When prescription safety glasses are issued, the Health Services optometrist completes a Notification of Issue of Safety Glasses form for the individual receiving the safety glasses and sends a copy to the individual’s supervisor. The form specifies the conditions under which the employee must wear safety glasses.
      4. The individual is responsible for wearing eye protection devices at all times in eye-hazard areas and whenever his or her work poses a reasonable probability of eye injury.
      5. All eye-protection devices issued by the Laboratory must comply with ANSI Standard Z87.1 (2003); these eye protection devices are marked “Z87.” Where there is a possibility of a hazard from flying particles, the eye protection must meet the High Impact Testing Requirements of Z87.1 (this eye protection is marked “Z87+”). When in use as eye-protection devices, safety glasses must have side shields or must be worn with safety goggles carrying the same ANSI approval.
      6. Four types of eye-protection devices are available:
        • Personal prescription safety glasses are issued through the Health Services Group.
        • Goggles, face shields, etc., may be purchased through the eProcurement system or from Stores.
        • Temporary nonprescription safety glasses are provided to visitors in eye-hazard areas.
        • Laser-safety eyewear is provided to employees by their division. The Laser Safety Officer, ext. 5256, will provide consultation regarding the appropriate type of eyewear and where to obtain it. (See Chapter 16, Laser Safety, for information on obtaining eyewear approved for protection against laser light and for information on required medical examinations.)

Work Process C. Procurement of PPE

  1. The Laboratory requires suitable equipment to protect employees from hazards in the workplace, as prescribed in 29 CFR 1910.132. The EHSS Division advises on PPE required for a task, but the supervisor of the operation must obtain this equipment and see that it is used.
  2. Protective clothing is purchased from approved vendors through the eProcurement system or through Stores (Building 79) with a valid account or work order number.
  3. All Berkeley Lab full-time employees who engage in eye-hazard operations are eligible to obtain prescription safety glasses at Laboratory expense. Potential eye-hazard operations are those that produce flying particles (e.g., using machining equipment or portable power tools), that involve the handling of hazardous liquids (e.g., in chemical labs, plating shops, and plastic shops), or that involve exposure to intense light (e.g., working with ultraviolet light). Prescription or nonprescription dark glasses are available only upon completion of a Request for Tinted Safety Glasses form by the supervisor. This form is available from Health Services in Building 26.
  4. The Health Services Group optometrist is available for consultation regarding occupational eye protection. Personnel requiring prescription safety glasses or laser-safety glasses should schedule an examination with the optometrist, who issues all safety glasses and screens individuals for use of laser-safety glasses. Damaged prescription safety glasses or frames issued by the Laboratory are replaced or repaired as necessary. The Health Services Group optometrist makes all adjustments and repairs to these safety glasses.

Work Process D. Authorization and Qualification to Use PPE

  1. Supervisors authorize PPE use for their employees through the Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) system. The supervisor of an operation is responsible for determining when PPE is needed and what PPE is suitable and must ensure that all employees and visitors use PPE when in active technical areas.
  2. Employees are qualified for PPE use based on the type of work that they perform. Employees who work in laboratories are trained in the use, maintenance, storage, and limitations of PPE by taking the Chemical Hygiene and Safety training (EHS0348). Employees who work in technical areas other than laboratories are trained in the use, maintenance, storage, and limitations of PPE by taking the Personal Protective Equipment training, EHS0161.

Work Process E. Specific PPE Requirements

EHSS Program

Link

Asbestos Work

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/ih/forms/AsbestosMgmtPlan.pdf

Beryllium Work

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH04.html#412

Biosafety

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH26.html

Chemical Safety

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/chsp/html/materials.shtml#PPE

Construction Sites

PPE are specified on the JHA
http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH10.html#106

Cryogenics

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH29/CH29.html#29d

Electrical Work

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH08/CH8.html#8.6.3

Fall Protection

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH30-quickstart.html http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH30/CH30.html

Hearing Protection

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH04.html#45

Laser Areas

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH16.html#165a

Lead Work

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH04.html#411

Machine Safeguarding

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH25.html#_Work_Process_A

Radioactive Materials Work

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH21.html

Respiratory Protection

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/ih/forms/respirator.pdf

Welding, Joining, and Thermal Cutting

http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH33.html#wpd

19.8 Source Requirements

19.9 Reference Documents

Document Number

PUB-3000 Reference

Title

Type

07.07.024.001

Chapter 19

Personal Protective Equipment

Program

Other References

PUB-3000, Chapter 4, Section 4.7

Chemicals

PUB-3000, Chapter 4, Section 4.13

Respiratory Protection

PUB-3000, Chapter 4, Section 4.5

Noise

PUB-3000, Chapter 4, Section 4.8

Asbestos

PUB-3000, Chapter 4, Section 4.11

Lead

PUB-3000, Chapter 8

Electrical Safety

PUB-3000, Chapter 10

Construction Safety Manual Administrative Policies

PUB-3000, Chapter 16

Laser Safety

PUB-3000, Chapter 21

Radiation Safety

PUB-3000, Chapter 25

Machine Safeguarding – Shop and Lab Machine Safety

PUB-3000, Chapter 26

Biosafety

PUB-3000, Chapter 29

Safe Handling of Cryogenic liquids

PUB-3000, Chapter 30

Fall Protection Program

PUB-3000, Chapter 33

Welding, Joining, and Thermal Cutting


 

19.10 Appendices

Appendix A. PPE and Food/Drink Requirements and Responsibilities Tables

Institutional Minimum Area PPE Requirements and Responsibilities

All task-specific PPE requirements in PUB-3000 and PPE requirements in formal authorizations or division ISM plans take precedence over this table. Incidental chemical use refers to:

Temporary task-generated area hazards include machine tool use, soldering, and wire-cutting.


Technical area

Party responsible to set minimum area PPE requirements

PUB-3000 PPE exceptions allowed?

Relative risk level

Chemistry lab/dedicated chemical storage area

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

Yes

High

Machine, craft, welding, or sheet metal shop

PUB-3000, Chapter 25

Yes

High

Areas controlled for radioactive contamination (e.g., designated work area, contamination area, etc.)

RPG (work authorization)

No

High

Biosafety Level 1 (BL1) or Biosafety Level 2 (BL2) laboratory

Area safety leader with EHSS consultation

NA

Medium

Other technical area with incidental chemical use

Area safety leader with EHSS consultation

NA

Medium

Other technical area with temporary task-generated area hazard

Area safety leader with EHSS consultation

NA

Medium

Other technical area with no chemical use or machine tools

Area safety leader

NA

Low

 

Institutional Food and Beverage Requirements

Incidental chemical use refers to:

Temporary task-generated area hazards include machine tool use, soldering, and wire-cutting. Covered food and closed drink containers may be transported through technical areas where food and beverage are not allowed.


Technical area

Are food and beverages allowed?

Relative risk level

Chemistry lab/dedicated chemical storage area

No

High

Machine, craft, welding, or sheet metal shop

No (exceptions allowed per PUB-3000, Chapter 25)

High

Areas controlled for radioactive contamination (e.g., designated work area, contamination area, etc.)

No

High

Biosafety Level 1 (BL1) or Biosafety Level 2 (BL2) laboratory

No

Medium

Other technical area with incidental chemical use

Yes (with area safety leader approval and EHS consultation)

Medium

Other technical area with temporary task-generated area hazard

No (during task)

Medium

Other technical area with no chemical use or machine tools

Yes (with area safety leader approval)

Low


Appendix B. FAQs about Reducing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Requirements and Changing the No-Food/Drink Policy in Technical Areas

Who makes the decision about area PPE requirements?

It is based on risk. In technical areas with no area hazards, the area safety lead decides. In technical areas with minimal area hazards, the area safety lead decides in consultation with the EHSS Division. Area PPE requirements in higher-hazard spaces are set by Berkeley Lab policy.

I already have a PPE exception approved by EHSS. Is this still valid?

Yes. Existing approved PPE exceptions remain valid.

How do I go about modifying the area PPE requirements in my space?

Contact your division safety coordinator to get started. He or she will be familiar with the interpretations and will know who to contact in the EHSS Division if they need to be consulted.

I have some chemicals in my technical area (solvents, glue, etc.), but it is not a full chemistry lab. Can I modify the area PPE requirements in my space?

This area may qualify for reduced area PPE requirements. Talk with your Division Safety Coordinator to verify. Remember that task-based PPE requirements still apply!

Can I designate a space within a chemistry or biology lab for lower area PPE requirements?

Yes. You will need to demonstrate that this area really does have minimal area hazards. Part of this demonstration will be showing that there is an effective separation, through some kind of physical barrier, space or other demarcation from the other laboratory hazards. Another part will be to show that you have effective controls in the lab to maintain this separation.

What if the area is a mixed room and there is no area safety leader?

Consider dividing the mixed room into several technical areas with one or more area safety leader(s). Consult with the appropriate division safety coordinator(s) to assist. If this cannot be done, then the most conservative regime should apply to the entire space.

Can you give examples of temporary task-generated area hazards?

Soldering, saw cutting, lifts, cutting wire are some examples.

I work in a lab that has no chemical use or task-based hazards (we test electronic equipment). Can I keep a cup of coffee at my work station in the lab?

Ask your area safety leader first. There might be non-safety reasons why coffee would not be allowed in the lab.

Why aren’t there more clear definitions of area PPE requirements?

We recognize the great diversity of technical areas at Berkeley Lab and realize that a single rule would not be able to meet the real risks in all of these different situations. Also, we want to encourage risk analysis and understanding rather than simply following rules.

 

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