Chapter 11
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Contents

Approved by Ron Pauer
Revised 09/13


11.1  Policy
11.2  Scope
11.3  Program Descriptions

11.3.1 Accidental Releases: See Chapter 51, Environmental Releases.
11.3.2 Air Emissions: See Chapter 49, Air Quality.
11.3.3 Environmental Management System
11.3.4 Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment: See Chapter 50, Environmental Radiological Protection Program.
11.3.5 Environmental Monitoring: See Chapter 62, Environmental Monitoring
11.3.6 Contaminated Vegetation Management: See Chapter 59, Vegetation Sampling and Management
11.3.7 Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Management: See Chapter 61, Soil and Groundwater Management.
11.3.8 Hazardous Wastewater Treatment Units See Chapter 53, Fixed Treatment Units.
11.3.9 Petroleum Products Storage: See Chapter 56, Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Program.
11.3.10 Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Management See Chapter 63.
11.3.11 Sanitary Sewer Discharges: See Chapter 55, Sanitary Sewer Program.
11.3.12 Storm Water Discharges: See Chapter 57, Storm Water Pollution Prevention
11.3.13 Underground Storage Tanks See Chapter 58.
11.3.14 Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention

11.4  Support Organizations
11.5  Responsible Parties

11.5.1  Principal Investigators and Supervisors
11.5.2  Employees
11.5.3  Environmental Services Group

11.6  Glossary
11.7  Standards

11.7.1  Federal
11.7.2  State
11.7.3  Local

11.8  Related LBNL/PUB-3000 Chapters
11.9  References

 

NOTE:
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. . . . . . . . Denotes the beginning of changed text within a section.
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11.1  Policy

It is the Laboratory’s environmental policy to perform work in a manner that protects the health of the public and preserves the quality of the environment. The Laboratory is committed to:

11.2  Scope

The Berkeley Lab environmental protection programs are designed to reduce the Laboratory's impacts on air, water, soil, and other environmental media and to conserve natural resources.  Many of these programs are managed by the Environmental Services Group (ESG), including:

11.3  Program Description

11.3.1  Accidental Releases

This program has been moved to Chapter 51, Environmental Releases.

11.3.2  Air Emissions

This program has been moved to Chapter 49, Air Quality.

11.3.3  Environmental Management System

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, requires all federal agencies to implement an Environmental Management System (EMS). An EMS is simply a systematic approach to achieving environmental goals. DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program, established the EMS requirement for all DOE facilities and, in addition, mandated that the EMS be integrated with existing Integrated Safety Management (ISM) systems.

LBNL maintains a performance-based EMS a systematic approach to ensuring that environmental stewardship activities are not only well managed but also provide business value while implementing sustainable practices. The performance-based approach includes all program elements of the ISO 14001 EMS Standard with emphasis given to elements that provide real and tangible business value. This approach allows the Lab to focus its resources on those activities that have the most environmental benefit while maintaining and building on the strengths of the current environmental compliance programs.

The goals of the LBNL EMS approach are to:

A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes is performed to achieve these EMS goals.

A cross-functional Core Team was formed to implement the EMS. The EMS Core Team is currently composed of representatives from the Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S), Facilities, and Procurement organizations, with team leadership provided by EH&S. The Core Team has been working on the following implementation tasks:

Internal assessments and external audits are performed to evaluate the effectiveness of LBNL’s EMS. The EMS program is audited at specified frequencies by the Lab's Office of Contract Assurance and audited by a third party to determine if all programmatic activities have been completed and to determine the effectiveness of the program. In addition, progress in achieving EMS objectives and targets and the results of EMS internal and external audits are reviewed annually by a Laboratory management team.

More information on Berkeley Lab’s Environmental Management System can be found at the ESG Web site.

11.3.4  Environmental Radiological Dose Assessment

This program has been moved to Chapter 50, Environmental Radiological Protection Program.

11.3.5  Environmental Monitoring

This program has been moved to Chapter 62, Environmental Monitoring.

11.3.6  Contaminated Vegetation Management

This program has been moved to Chapter 59, Vegetation Sampling and Management.

11.3.7 Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Management

This program has been moved to Chapter 61, Soil and Groundwater Management.

11.3.8 Hazardous Wastewater Treatment Units

This program has been moved to Chapter 53, Fixed Treatment Units.

11.3.9 Petroleum Products Storage

This program has been moved to Chapter 56, Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasures Program.

11.3.10 Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Management

This program has been moved to Chapter 63.

11.3.11 Sanitary Sewer Discharges

This program has been moved to Chapter 55.

11.3.12  Storm Water Discharges

This program has been moved to Chapter 57, Storm Water Pollution Prevention

11.3.13  Underground Storage Tanks

This program has been moved to Chapter 58, Underground Storage Tanks.

11.3.14 Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention

LBNL is required by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Department of Energy to reduce the generation of hazardous, non-hazardous, and radioactive wastes; prevent pollution of air, water and land; and conserve energy, water and natural resources.

Under DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.1B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management, DOE requires LBNL to meet goals with objectives and measurable targets that accomplish the following:

Waste minimization and pollution prevention are implemented site-wide by all staff at LBNL in accordance with the environmental policy stated earlier in this chapter. Strategies, measures development, and implementation guidance on waste minimization is provided through the Waste Management Group with the Environmental Services Group providing similar support on pollution prevention.

Waste minimization and pollution prevention strategies and measures help reduce the environmental impact of LBNL research and operational activities, as well as reduce the burden of compliance with environmental regulations. Waste minimization and pollution prevention strategies and measures may include performing pollution prevention opportunity assessments and life-cycle cost analyses. Failure to minimize waste and prevent pollution can increase exposures to hazards and toxic chemicals in the workplace, increase liabilities under federal and state laws and regulations, and increase costs associated with air pollution control, wastewater treatment, waste generation, waste disposal, and site remediation.

As part of its Environmental Management System, LBNL is committed to integrating waste minimization, pollution prevention, resource conservation, and environmental compliance into all planning and decision-making and applying cost-effective practices to eliminate, minimize, or mitigate environmental impacts.

Waste minimization and pollution prevention concerns can be reasonably addressed as follows:

Additional information on waste reduction and pollution prevention measures are found on the ESG and WMG web sites.

11.4  Support Organizations

11.5  Responsible Parties

11.5.1  Principal Investigators and Supervisors

11.5.2  Employees

11.5.3  Environmental Services Group

11.6  Glossary

Acutely hazardous wastes are any wastes defined as acutely hazardous by 22 CCR, Division 4.5, Chapter 11, Article 4.

As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is an approach to radiological management and control that aims to keep exposures (individual and collective) to the general public and the environment at levels as low as is reasonable, taking into account social, technical, economic, practical, and public policy considerations. As used in this manual, ALARA is not a dose limit but a process that has the objective of attaining doses as far below the applicable controlling limits as is reasonably achievable.

Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) is the local agency responsible for regulating stationary sources of regulated or hazardous air pollutants in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) is a Department within the California Environmental Protection Agency that regulates hazardous waste management and remedial actions.

East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) is the local municipal wastewater treatment facility that accepts and regulates sanitary sewer discharges from Berkeley Lab.

Effluent is any treated or untreated liquid discharge from Berkeley Lab or from a Laboratory facility.

Emission is any filtered or unfiltered substance released to the air from Berkeley Lab or from a Laboratory facility.

Environmental monitoring is the collection and analysis of environmental samples or direct measurements of environmental media.  Environmental monitoring consists of three major activities:  effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and meteorological monitoring.

Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples, or direct measurements of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media from Berkeley Lab and its environs, for the purpose of determining compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, assessing radiation exposures of members of the public, and assessing the effects, if any, on the local environment.

Environmental occurrence is any sudden or sustained deviation from a regulated or planned performance at an operation that has environmental protection and compliance significance.

Environmentally-preferable products, and services are goods and services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health and the environment when compared with other goods and services that serve the same purpose.

Extremely hazardous waste is any hazardous waste or mixture of hazardous wastes that, if human exposure should occur, may result in death, disabling personal injury, or serious illness because of its quantity, concentration, or chemical characteristics (22 CCR Section 66261.110).

Hazardous air pollutant is any pollutant that is listed in Section 112(b) of the Clean Air Act.

Hazardous wastes are wastes exhibiting any of the following characteristics:  ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity.  In addition, EPA has listed specific wastes as hazardous that do not necessarily exhibit these characteristics.

Life-cycle cost analysis is a procurement evaluation technique that determines the total cost of acquisition, operation, maintenance, and disposal of items being acquired.

Pollution prevention is reducing or eliminating waste at the source by modifying production processes, promoting the use of non-toxic or less-toxic substances, implementing conservation techniques, and re-using materials rather than putting them into the waste stream.

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment is a systematic, structured appraisal of a process, activity, or operation to identify and evaluate potential activities that will eliminate or reduce waste, conserve natural resources, reduce toxic chemical or hazardous material use, and recycle materials

Public Owned Treatment Works (POTW) is a general term used for sewage treatment plants.  The East Bay Municipal Utility District plant is the POTW that accepts sewage from Berkeley Lab.

Radionuclide is a natural or manmade atom that spontaneously undergoes radioactive decay.

Regulated air pollutants are pollutants for which standards have been promulgated under the authority of the Clean Air Act, and include the classes of substances defined as nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, toxic air contaminants, or ozone-depleting substances.

State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) is the agency responsible for promulgating the California General Permit for Storm Water Discharge Associated With Industrial Activities.  At Berkeley Lab, this permit is administered and enforced by the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board, with assistance from the City of Berkeley.

Sustainable design means taking a systems approach to design and construction for facilities, systems, and equipment that insures consideration of the optimization of ecological and human issues in light of acceptable economic constraints. Considerations include measures such as optimizing site potential, minimizing energy consumption, protecting and conserving water, using environmentally preferable products, and services, enhancing indoor environmental quality, and optimizing operational and maintenance practices.

Underground storage tank (UST) is a stationary device designed to contain an accumulation of hazardous material or waste.  A tank is constructed primarily of nonearthen material, but the entire surface area of the tank is totally below the surface of, and covered by, the ground.

United States Environmental Protection Agency is a federal agency responsible for enforcing environmental laws.  In California, some of this responsibility is typically delegated to state and local regulatory agencies.

Waste minimization is defined by the US EPA as measures that reduce the volume and toxicity of hazardous waste disposed to landfills. California defines waste minimization as measures that reduce, eliminate, or recycle hazardous waste at the point in a process where such waste may be generated.

11.7  Standards

11.7.1  Federal

11.7.2  State

11.7.3  Local

11.8  Related LBNL/PUB-3000 Chapters

11.9  References

All of the above references can be found in the Environmental Services Group offices, located in Building 85B. Several are available on the Web, as noted in this chapter.

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